Policy and Economics of Hazards

Fuel-Reduction-Burn-Vic_3.jpg

Reducing the risk through fuel reduction burning
Reducing the risk through fuel reduction burning

Project Status:

This project will develop a 'broad brush-stroke' national picture of vulnerability and values at risk to bushfire and natural hazards at the institutional scale.

Current government spending on natural disaster response is more than 20 times the spending on preparedness. Many climaterelated natural hazards are increasing, along with the number of people living in hazard prone areas. Large natural disasters also cross domains, moving from the private to the public realm, and shifting from a local, to a state or national concern. This raises the potential of future, unmanaged risks.

The spending mismatch is well understood, but potential deficits in important social and environmental values are also faced that may not be adequately compensated. If a risk is owned, then the balance between preparedness and response can be assessed. If the risk is un-owned, these values may be damaged and degraded, or lost.

The project is mapping a broad range of economic, social and environmental values and relating these to natural hazards across several case studies. It is exploring who owns these values and what happens when they cross domains, as well as how a range of alternative strategies may contribute to improved resilience by sustaining economic, social and environmental values in a changing environment. A governance framework to support better understanding of risk ownership is being developed.

This project aims to benefit decision makers in institutional areas such as local, state and federal government, the community, and relevant private sectors by helping them to better identify the different economic, social and environmental values at risk from natural hazards. It also aims to help clarify areas of risk ownership and show how governance can support the long-term management of natural hazard risk with respect to preparedness, resilience and effective recovery.

A series of workshops have been held in Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania with end-user partners, who mapped the risk associated with various hazard scenarios.

Photo by Michelle Robinson/Flickr/cc
7 March, 2017
In an increasingly complex and connected world, the types of decisions we need to make and how we make them is changing.
AJEM October 2016 cover
26 October, 2016
Many peer-reviewed papers from the AFAC16 powered by INTERSCHUTZ Research Forum have been published in a special edition of the Australian Journal of Emergency Management.
13 October, 2016
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Holger Maier presents at the 2016 Hobart RAF
24 June, 2016
A number of insights around who dies in floods, mitigation benefits, estimating resilience and economics were key takeways for me from the Research Advisory Forum in Hobart.
Year Type Citation
2016 Report Young, C., Symons, J. & Jones, R. Institutional maps of risk ownership for strategic decision making. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Understanding values at risk and risk ownership workshop synthesis report. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Mapping and understanding bushfire and natural hazard vulnerability and risks at the institutional scale: Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2015 Conference Paper Rumsewicz, M. Research proceedings from the 2015 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC conference. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC annual conference 2015 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Conference Paper Jones, R., Young, C. & Symons, J. Risk ownership and natural hazards: across systems and across values - peer viewed. Adelaide Conference 2015 (2015).
2015 Report Young, C. & Jones, R. Mapping and Understanding Bushfire and Natural Hazard Vulnerability and Risks at the Institutional Scale Annual Report 2014. (2015).
2015 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Mapping and understanding bushfire and natural hazard vulnerability and risks at the institutional scale: Annual project report 2014-2015. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Report Young, C., Symons, J. & Jones, R. Whose risk is it anyway?. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2014 Report Young, C. The Problem Solution Framework. (2014).
Communicating Dynamic Risk in a Connected World; Perceptions and Possibilities
18 Aug 2015

Bushfires and natural hazards are a dynamic risk where risk levels are unpredictable and more likely to change or fluctuate quickly. They are also often systemic and can result in unanticipated outcoms. Communication in this area is crucial and is only effective if it is based upon a broader understanding of how people respond to dynamic risk and why.

Download:
Roger Jones Conference Poster 2016
12 Aug 2016

The project has moved its focus from spatial mapping towards insitutional mapping to support strategic decision making surrounding prevention, preparedness, recovery and resilience using a multi-value approach.

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