Published works

Published works

Learning for emergency services: looking for a new approach

TitleLearning for emergency services: looking for a new approach
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsEburn, M, Dovers, S
Document Number357
Date Published11/2017
InstitutionBushfire and Natural Hazards CRC
CityMelbourne
Report Number357
Abstract

This paper reviews the processes used in inquiries following significant natural hazard events, and in particular bushfires. It is argued that the coroner/Royal Commissioner model has not proved effective in identifying learning that will help communities to rebuild relationships after an event, or develop resilience in anticipation of the next event.

After identifying shortcomings with current practices the paper argues for an alternative approach to post event inquiries. Restorative justice is a concept established in the area of criminal law but it is argued that guidance from the community of restorative practitioners could assist in formulating enquiries that would assist all stakeholders to come together and resolve, collectively, how to deal with the aftermath of disaster and the implications for the future.

The paper also argues that a standing Fire and Emergency Safety Bureau should be considered to conduct some enquiries and to act as a standing secretariat for inquiries in the nature of a Royal Commission.

Issues of compensation for those affected by natural disasters are touched upon.

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