Jackson Parker

End-user
About
Jackson Parker

Lead end user

This project is building on existing research to broaden the knowledge of the vulnerability of Australian building stock to riverine flooding and is identifying suitable retrofitting strategies. Existing building schema have been assessed, both national and internationally. This led to the development of a new building classification schema to categorise residential buildings into a range of typical storey types. Mitigation strategies developed nationally and internationally have been reviewed.
Research team:
This research has developed a prototype, high-resolution soil-moisture analysis system called JASMIN, which is a significant improvement in accuracy compared to currently used models. It is based on research that examines the use of land surface models, remotely sensed satellite measurements and data assimilation techniques to improve the monitoring and prediction of soil dryness. The new information will be calibrated for use within the existing fire prediction systems. This retains the accuracy, temporal and spatial resolution of the new product without changing the overall climatology of Forest Fire Danger Index and other calculations based on soil moisture.
This project is applying physics-based approaches to fire scenarios. It attempts to simulate fire with unprecedented detail and in the process obtain useful application tools for end-users.
This study is identifying the thresholds beyond which dynamic fire behaviour becomes a dominant factor, the effects that these dynamic effects have on the overall power output of a fire, and the impacts that such dynamic effects have on fire severity. This will necessarily include consideration of other factors such as how fine fuel moisture varies across a landscape. The research team is investigating the conditions and processes under which bushfire behaviour undergoes major transitions, including fire convection and plume dynamics, evaluating the consequences of eruptive fire behaviour (spotting, convection driven wind damage, rapid fire spread) and determining the combination of conditions for such behaviours to occur (unstable atmosphere, fuel properties and weather conditions).
Research team:

Resources credited

Type Released Title Download Key Topics
Presentation-Slideshow 07 Jul 2016 Kimberley grasslands curing PDF icon Save (1.66 MB) fire, land management, Northern Australia

Send a message to Jackson Parker (via CRC)

User Contact