News from the CRC

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Year in Review 2015-2016
Year in Review 2015-2016
Release date
16 Dec 2016
More information:
Nathan Maddock
Senior Communications Officer

A year of highlights

The 2015-2016 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC annual report reviews a big 12 months for the CRC, and is now ready to read at the link below. Hard copies are currently in the mail for our partners. A more formal annual report was submitted to the CRC Program at the end of October.

Over the year the ongoing development of the research agenda included extensive engagement with end-users, researchers and the broader community with a stake in natural hazards management. Under the watch of a new International Science Advisory Panel, the research program was reviewed to identify and map the progress for utilisation opportunities. A process towards refreshing the research program in 2017 was established.

Highlights include:

  • Utilisation case studies on the Child-centred disaster risk reduction, Connecting communities and resilience, Disaster landscape attribution, An analysis of building losses and human fatalities from natural disasters, Practical decision tools for improved decision-making, Decision support system and Out of uniform projects
  • Bushfire Information System – developed and tested for operational prediction of live fuel moisture content and fire occurrence
  • Structure from Motion technique – developed and tested in a beta smartphone application to allow the rapid and quantitative characterisation of the 3D structure of fuels of fire prone environments
  • Disaster resilience for schools – to provide Australian emergency management agencies with a strategic, evidence-based approach for school programs that reduce risk and increase resilience
  • Bushfire education kit – ‘Guide to Working with School Communities’, a New South Wales Rural Fire Service schools kit based on research to help children understand bushfire preparation and safety
  • National Fire Danger Rating – development of the science behind a new system for the National Emergency Management Projects program
  • Tsunami warning – national program reviewed for the Australian Tsunami Advisory Group of the Australia and New Zealand Emergency Management Committee (ANZEMC)
  • Emergency warnings – focus group research and social media analysis examining community comprehension of messages that will lead to recommendations to improve phrasing and content
  • Non-traditional volunteers – identified key changes and impacts on the recruitment and use of volunteers by emergency organisations
  • Multi-hazard mitigation planning – to support decision making during bushfire, flood, earthquake and heatwave, applied to a South Australian case study
  • Animal emergency management – reviewed all national and state legislation, plans, policies and guidelines
  • Flood fatalities – report written for the Prevention of Flood Related Deaths Working Group of ANZEMC

More news from the CRC

Do you and your agency use our research? Nominate for the AFAC News Knowledge Innovation Award by this Friday 21 July, presented at #AFAC17.
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People continue to enter floodwater in vehicles and on foot, despite many knowing the risks.
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Australasia’s emergency management leaders to discuss sectors need for interoperability and emerging trends at conference
Fiona Dunstan from the CFS spoke about the benefits of CRC science in influencing emergency warnings.
Research Driving Change - Showcase 2017 highlighted the practical research outcomes of the last four years of research, with case studies and utilisation examples from across the CRC research program presented by our...
A flood wipes out a bridge in southern WA, February 2017. Photo: Dana Fairhead
A set of priorities for national research into natural hazards in Australia has been launched by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Research Driving Change Showcase 2017
A set of priorities for national research into natural hazards in Australia was launched at the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC Research Driving Change Showcase 2017 in Adelaide.
The NSW Rural Fire Service and Tasmania Fire Service fighting the Tasmanian fires in early 2016. Photo: Mick Reynolds, NSW RFS
Emergency managers and policy makers from across Australia will be in Adelaide on 4-5 July to discuss how national research by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC is making communities safer.
Fire risk sign near Margaret River.
A new case study of bushfire, earthquake and coastal inundation will take place in Western Australia thanks to funding through the Commonwealth Government's Natural Disaster Resilience Program.
The research poster display was a highlight of the AFAC16 Research Forum
How can we influence communities to develop and implement practices that will make them more resilient to natural hazards? This is one of the questions that will be asked at the Research Forum of AFAC17 powered by...
NSW Rural Fire Service post-incident task force
The Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC will head up a taskforce to conduct important research in fire-affected areas of NSW.

News archives

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

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