News from the CRC

peter_mooney_tas_parks_and_wildlife_dep_sec_web.jpg

Deputy Secretary of the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, Peter Mooney, opens the Hobart RAF.
Deputy Secretary of the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, Peter Mooney, opens the Hobart RAF.
Release date
18 May 2016
More information:
Dr Michael Rumsewicz
Former Research Director

Research focus in Hobart

A packed house was on hand in Hobart for the first Research Advisory Forum (RAF) of 2016, with more than 130 end-users, researchers and PhD students from around the country gathering to discuss the latest research findings.

Opened by the Deputy Secretary of the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, Peter Mooney, the two days was the largest RAF ever, and featured presentations from projects within the Resilience and Policy themes of the research program, as well as in-depth workshops between end-users and researchers on transitioning the research to utilisation.

All presentations from the two days are available on the Hobart RAF page, under the resources tab.

Each project gave a 30 minute presentation, which included an overview on the state of the project and findings so far. End-user representatives also discussed how they thought each project was going and where it was headed in terms of research utilisation. Projects showcased include studies from the following clusters:

  • Governance and institutional knowledge
  • Economics, policy and decision-making
  • Scenarios and loss analysis
  • Communications and warning
  • Understanding and measuring social resilience
  • Sustainable volunteering
  • Emergency management capability

The first day of the RAF also coincided with Wear Orange Wednesday, with many attendees dressing in orange in support of the SES.

Research Advisory Forum, Hobart, May 2016
Research Advisory Forum, Hobart, May 2016

The RAF supports both the research and utilisation aims of the CRC and allows for a more intensive discussion on the progress of each project as well as providing more opportunities for informal networking.

More news from the CRC

New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Prescribed burning underway. Photo Veronique Florec
Not everything that is important can be assigned a dollar value, with research helping natural hazards managers justify the use and allocation of resources for mitigation efforts.
Photo: Rex Boggs (CC By-ND 2.0)
CRC research is informing community flood warning campaigns, emergency services training and national policy initiatives.
Photo: Nathan Maddock, Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC
Sophisticated fire mapping and modelling of fire severity is helping fire and land managers assess greenhouse gas emissions and develop carbon abatement plans.
NSW RFS Schools Program, photo by Ben Shepherd NSW RFS
Educating children and youth about disaster risk reduction and resilience is now front and centre around Australia, based on research that has identified the valuable role that children play in the safety of their...
Mud Army and SES volunteers working together at the 2011 Queensland floods. Photo: Queensland Fire and Emergency Services
Research has influenced key national initiatives, with findings used extensively for the development of the National Spontaneous Volunteer Strategy, handbook development by AIDR and the new NSW SES Volunteering Reimagined...
Black Saturday 2009 Kinglake
Research is helping government and emergency management agencies identify and allocate ownership of risks, how risk owners are responsible, and what they can do to manage them.
Planning for animals during an emergency adds another layer of complexity.
Australians love their pets – and this influences how people behave during an emergency, with emergency services incorporating findings from research to influence their plans and policies during disasters.
A flood wipes out a bridge in southern WA, February 2017. Photo: Dana Fairhead
Changing the focus of warning messages based on research has been the key to ensure critical safety advice is heard and acted upon.
Photo: Sascha Grant CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Using the latest satellite-based earth observation systems and the Himawari satellite, research will allow fire managers to hone in on bushfires before they become too large to handle.

News archives

AFAC17 logo

AFAC17 logo

All the resources from our 2017 conference

National research priorities for natural hazards

National research priorities for natural hazards

National priorities for research

November update: Southern Australian Seasonal Bushfire Outlook 2017-18

Bushfire outlook 2017-18

Four years of highlights

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

Explore by keyword