News from the CRC

Fire Australia magazine 2015/16 edition

Fire Australia magazine 2015/16 edition
Fire Australia magazine 2015/16 edition

Magazine explores CRC research, case studies and technology

The Summer 2015/2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine features key research that’s making an impact on the fire, emergency services and land management sectors, including case studies, advances in technology and the application of local knowledge.  

The magazine, published by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, AFAC and the Fire Protection Association Australia, provides a quarterly update on the latest news, developments, research and technical information for the industry.

A highlight from this edition – Smart phones and sky scans for better fire mapping – explores the potential for more accurate mapping of bushfires using satellite technology. CRC researchers from the Disaster Landscape Attribution project have developed an app which will help land managers quickly and more accurately assess fuel loads before and after prescribed burns.

Be Ready Warrandyte examines a case study conducted by the CRC Out of uniform project in Warrandyte, Victoria, focusing on community-led initiatives for bushfire preparedness. Researcher Dr Blythe McLennan looks at the challenges and opportunities of sharing responsibility when preparing for bushfires.

In Perceptions of risk and connection to landscape, understanding people's sense of bushfire risk and connection to the landscape in which they live has helped researchers develop a visual mapping tool kit for working with residents of fire-prone areas. The tool kit has been developed by AFAC and is available here.

Reflecting on the 2015 International Day for Disaster Reduction, Knowledge for life, considers how combining traditional, local and Indigenous practices with current science and research can help remote communities reduce the risk of disasters.

How would Adelaide hold up if an earthquake struck? A case study put together by CRC researchers asks the question, What if a large earthquake hit Adelaide? In the case study the South Australian capital is put to the test of a realistic earthquake disaster scenario using a methodology developed by the research team. 

More news from the CRC

Do you and your agency use our research? Nominate for the AFAC News Knowledge Innovation Award by this Friday 21 July, presented at #AFAC17.
water over road.jpg
People continue to enter floodwater in vehicles and on foot, despite many knowing the risks.
AFAC_CRC_Conf
Australasia’s emergency management leaders to discuss sectors need for interoperability and emerging trends at conference
Fiona Dunstan from the CFS spoke about the benefits of CRC science in influencing emergency warnings.
Research Driving Change - Showcase 2017 highlighted the practical research outcomes of the last four years of research, with case studies and utilisation examples from across the CRC research program presented by our...
A flood wipes out a bridge in southern WA, February 2017. Photo: Dana Fairhead
A set of priorities for national research into natural hazards in Australia has been launched by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Research Driving Change Showcase 2017
A set of priorities for national research into natural hazards in Australia was launched at the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC Research Driving Change Showcase 2017 in Adelaide.
The NSW Rural Fire Service and Tasmania Fire Service fighting the Tasmanian fires in early 2016. Photo: Mick Reynolds, NSW RFS
Emergency managers and policy makers from across Australia will be in Adelaide on 4-5 July to discuss how national research by the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC is making communities safer.
Fire risk sign near Margaret River.
A new case study of bushfire, earthquake and coastal inundation will take place in Western Australia thanks to funding through the Commonwealth Government's Natural Disaster Resilience Program.
The research poster display was a highlight of the AFAC16 Research Forum
How can we influence communities to develop and implement practices that will make them more resilient to natural hazards? This is one of the questions that will be asked at the Research Forum of AFAC17 powered by...
NSW Rural Fire Service post-incident task force
The Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC will head up a taskforce to conduct important research in fire-affected areas of NSW.

News archives

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

Explore by keyword

Index of Editions

Issue Two of Fire Australia for 2017 features information about a weather phenomena called a mountain wave that produces severe fire behaviour, an analysis of flood fatalities in Australia, what we can learn about disaster preparation from Indonesia, and leadership for our emergency service volunteers.
Issue One of Fire Australia for 2017 features firestorms, disaster resilience, fire preparation in Bangladesh and the International Day for Disaster Reduction.
PhD progress, human factors and decision-making capabilities, asbestos risk and the role of pharmacies in disasters are showcased in the Spring 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine.
The Winter 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine highlights important research including reducing hazard impacts with smarter spending, fire modelling and wind behaviour as well as the rewarding experience of PhD student placements in the sector.
Mitigating disasters: how damage from floods, fires and storms can be prevented through careful planning and investment; a new approach to flood forecasting using remote sensing data; and case studies from the CRC are highlighting paths to integrate bushfire science into government policy and planning.
Developing a smartphone app to measure fuels for bushfire, 2015's International Day for Disaster Reduction, a case study on the Be Ready Warrandyte initiative and a look at what could happen if Adelaide was hit by a large earthquake.
Community resilience in the remote north, how NSW RFS used research to change their approach to engagement around bushfire survival planning, and case studies on CRC research impact.
How extreme water levels could impact Australia's coasts and what can be done to mitigate the risks, the gulf in earthquake risk reduction, and a look at the milestone UN Sendai conference on risk reduction.
The vital elements of operational fire modelling and retrofitting older homes for severe wind events.
How a rural fire brigade used national research findings on community safety, comparing disasters today to those of 100 years ago, and preparing children for disasters can have positive impacts on entire communities.