News from the CRC

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CRC students in Wellington for the 2014 annual conference
CRC students in Wellington for the 2014 annual conference
Release date
11 Feb 2016
More information:
Dr Michael Rumsewicz
Research Director

Calling all PhD’s

If you are studying a PhD in a natural hazards-related area, or know someone who is, then the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC scholarship program represents a great opportunity. Applications are now open and close 28 February.

Being a CRC scholarship recipient provides not only funding support, but also access to the emergency services and land management industry and research leaders. Recipients receive either a full scholarship ($28,000 per year for three and a half years) or a top up scholarship ($10,000 per year for three and a half years).

CRC Education Manager Lyndsey Wright said this application round was open to all fields aligned to the CRC research program, but three areas would be given preference.

“Applications are encouraged from all areas, but preference will be given to students completing their PhD in economics and strategic decision making, emergency management capability and coastal management.”

“If you are a student who is studying in one of these area, or you know someone who is, please check the eligibility,” she said.

In addition to the scholarship program, the CRC also offers an Associate Student program. While Associate Students do not receive funding, this program offers students the opportunity to be part of the CRC network across Australia and New Zealand. Students do not need to be directly connected to a CRC current projects – indeed current Associate Students are researching topics as diverse as parenting after disasters, coastal governance, and firefighting fatigue. All Associate Student’s will have their research profiled on the CRC website, and if they are located in Australia, will be invited to selected local events in their state. Associate Student’s also have the opportunity to apply for travel support funding to showcase their research at relevant conferences. Associate Student status is available to Masters and PhD students studying full or part-time, either in Australia or overseas. 

Application forms and further information about both programs are available on the Education section of the website.  

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News archives

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