Dr Sarah Hall

Completed PhD student
About
Dr Sarah Hall

Dr Sarah Hall’s PhD investigated the effect of working on-call on the sleep and physiological stress of fire and emergency service workers. Participants in this study wore an activity monitor on their wrist for two weeks and completed a daily sleep and work diary, they also collected saliva samples for the first week of the study.

Sarah used this data to examine how subjective and objective sleep is affected when working on-call from home and to quantify the effect of working on-call from home on the activity of the two main stress systems. Sarah found that some aspects of sleep and physiological stress are affected by this form of work scheduling.

Sarah was a regular presenter to the AFAC Work Health and Safety Technical Group and is currently working at Deakin University teaching physiology and continuing her research involving the physiological stress systems.

Student project

This research is examining the effect of working on-call on the sleep and physiological stress of fire and emergency service workers. Male fire and emergency service workers aged 18-75 are being recruited for the study. Sleep, wake and work patterns will be recorded during a two-week period, as well saliva samples. The study seeks to understand what happens to a person’s physiology when an emergency call occurs overnight, and what happens on nights when an individual is on-call, but no call occurs.
Supervisory panel:

Research team

Type Project Research team
Tactical Research Fund SES fit for task Caleb Lewis, cwalker, Georgia Verry, asilk, rtait, blarsen, shall, Jamie Tait, Angus Pike
Stress in fire and emergency service workers operating on-call from home
30 Jun 2017
How does working on-call from home affect your stress? Are you stressed in anticipation to a night...
Sarah Hall Conference Poster 2016
12 Aug 2016
How does operating on-call from home impact sleep, even when no call occurs?

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