Mitchell Scovell

Associate student
About
Mitchell Scovell

Cyclones can cause significant damage to housing in high-risk areas. And due to a changing climate and increasing coastal population, the number of individuals vulnerable to property damage is likely to increase. Installing structural upgrades (e.g., cyclone shutters) can reduce this damage but the uptake of these upgrades in cyclone-prone regions has been relatively low. Mitchell’s project investigates the psychological factors that influence cyclone mitigation behaviour. In particular, his research focuses on understanding the ways in which people perceive long-term cyclone risk and how people make decisions around installing structural upgrades. The findings will be used to inform risk communication messaging to promote mitigation behaviour in cyclone-prone regions. Mitchell has been an active communicator about his research throughout his PhD, winning the James Cook University Three Minute Thesis competition in 2018, and making the final of the Asia-Pacific competition. He also submitted a video for the CRC Association’s Early Career Researcher communication competition in 2019.

Student project

Due to a changing climate and increasing coastal population, the number of individuals vulnerable to property damage from cyclones is likely to increase. In order to mitigate the economic losses and negative physical and mental health outcomes from these events, the implementation of specific cyclone mitigation behaviours is necessary. This project aims to investigate the psychosocial factors that influence cyclone mitigation behaviours. Findings will be used to inform strategic risk communication to promote mitigation behaviour in cyclone-prone regions. 

Send a message to Mitchell Scovell (via CRC)

User Contact