Resilience to Hazards

Project Status:

This project commenced in July 2017. Within the context of reducing natural hazard risk and increasing resilience in southern Australia, it focuses explicitly on the risk and resilience priorities of Indigenous communities in southern Australia, the emergency management sector’s priorities for these communities, and how these interests interact. Its intention is to identify where improvements might be made to reduce natural hazard risk and increase social and ecological resilience. This research complements existing and completed CRC projects.

This project commenced in July 2017. Within the context of reducing natural hazard risk and increasing resilience in southern Australia, it focuses explicitly on the risk and resilience priorities of Indigenous communities in southern Australia, the emergency management sector’s priorities for these communities, and how these interests interact. Its intention is to identify where improvements might be made to reduce natural hazard risk and increase social and ecological resilience. This research complements existing and completed CRC projects.

Drawing upon and supporting innovation where it is occurring, this project will engage with natural hazards practitioners and decision-makers (including those of Indigenous and other cultural backgrounds) and Indigenous communities. The project’s intention is to build an inclusive narrative of intercultural hazard risk management which Indigenous peoples and practitioners can buy into. Building trust, capacity and knowledge in these intercultural contexts will reduce risk to Indigenous peoples, the wider community, and the environments in which we live.

This action-research project has three objectives:

  • Investigate the hazard priorities of diverse Indigenous communities in southern Australia, and the emergency management sector’s engagement with these communities;
  • Conduct collaborative research with Indigenous peoples and sector practitioners to explore how better engagement can be supported, with a focus on the interaction of scientific, Indigenous and other knowledge sources;
  • Analyse and report on what this dynamic intercultural context can offer practice and policy, including with respect to the merging of risk and resilience agendas.
Dean Freeman, Jackson Taylor-Grant and Tim Neale talking about the project at AFAC17. Photo: Adam Leavesley
13 November, 2017
This is the October 2017 newsletter from the Hazards, culture and Indigenous communities project, with updates for project end-users.
Gamba grass burn
13 November, 2017
This is the October 2017 newsletter from the Scientific diversity, scientific uncertainty and risk mitigation policy and planning project (RMPP), with updates for project end-users.
For the first time, emergency services and police across Australia will be surveyed about their mental health and wellbeing
31 August, 2017
A new direction of natural hazards research is set to begin, with nine new research projects from the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
22 March, 2017
An exciting new direction of natural hazards research in Australia is set to begin, with eight new Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC projects beginning in July. These new projects, covering coastal management, emergency management capability, land use planning and recovery, are part of the next phase of national research into natural hazards.
Year Type Citation
2017 Conference Paper Rumsewicz, M. Research proceedings from the 2017 Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC and AFAC Conference. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC & AFAC annual conference 2017 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2017 Conference Paper Parsons, M. & Lykins, A. Cultural worldviews and natural hazard risk perception: a pilot study of Australian adults. AFAC17 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).

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