Our People

Ross Bradstock
Project Leader

About

Ross Bradstock is the Director of the Centre for Environmental Risk Management of Bushfires at the University of Wollongong.

His research interests include Fire ecology, Conservation biology, Landscape ecology and Climate change.

Project leadership

Prescribed burning in Australia currently stands at a cross roads. The 2009 Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission recommended an annual treatment target of 5% of public land in Victoria. Subsequently, concerns have been formally raised (e.g. Bushfires Royal Commission Implementation Monitor 2013 Annual Report) that such an area-based target may not deliver the most effective levels of risk reduction for people and property in Victoria. Concurrently, some other States have adopted such a prescribed burning target, but formal attempts to evaluate its effects on risk to people, property and environmental values across different jurisdictions are lacking. Such extrapolation of the 2009 BFRC recommendation pre-supposes that there is a “one-size fits all” solution to the problem. While many agencies are moving toward planning systems supposedly based on risk assessment, knowledge of the best way to use prescribed fire to reduce risk to key values is generally lacking.
This project was commissioned and funded entirely by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, Victoria.
Year Type Citation
2016 Journal Article Nolan, R. et al. Predicting dead fine fuel moisture at regional scales using vapour pressure deficit from MODIS and gridded weather data. Remote Sensing of Environment 174, (2016).
2016 Journal Article Driscoll, D. A. et al. Resolving future fire management conflicts using multi-criteria decision making. Conservation Biology 30, 196-205 (2016).
2016 Report Bradstock, R. A. From hectares to tailor-made solutions for risk mitigation: systems to deliver effective prescribed burning across Australian ecosystems: Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2015 Presentation Bradstock, R. A. From hectares to tailor-made solutions for risk mitigation: systems to deliver effective prescribed burning across Australian ecosystems. (2015).
2015 Report Penman, T. D., Parkins, K. A., Mascaro, S., Chong, D. & Bradstock, R. A. National Fire Danger Rating System Probabalistic Framework: year three report. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Journal Article Price, O. F., Penman, T. D., Bradstock, R. A., Boer, M. M. & Clarke, H. Biogeographical variation in the potential effectiveness of prescribed fire in south-eastern Australia. Journal of Biogeography 42, 2234-2245 (2015).
2015 Journal Article Nolan, R., Lane, P. N. J., Benyon, R. G., Bradstock, R. A. & Mitchell, P. J. Trends in evapotranspiration and streamflow following wildfire in resprouting eucalypt forests. Journal of Hydrology 524, 614-624 (2015).
2014 Report Penman, T. D., Bedward, M. & Bradstock, R. A. National Fire Danger Rating System Probabalistic Framework: year two report. (2014).
2013 Journal Article Morris, R. et al. Environmental assessment of erosion following prescribed burning in the Mount Lofty Ranges, Australia. International Journal of Wildland Fire (2013). doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WF13011
2013 Journal Article Keane, R. E. et al. Exploring the role of fire, succession, climate, and weather on landscape dynamics using comparative modeling. Ecological Modelling 266, 172-186 (2013).
2012 Book Chapter Cary, G. J., Bradstock, R. A., A. Gill, M. & Williams, R. J. Flammable Australia: Fire Regimes, Biodiversity and Ecosystems in a Changing World 149-170 (CSIRO Publishing, 2012). at <http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/6836.htm>
2012 Book Chapter Cary, G. J., Bradstock, R. A., A. Gill, M. & Williams, R. J. Flammable Australia: Fire Regimes, Biodiversity and Ecosystems in a Changing World (CSIRO Publishing, 2012). at <http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/6836.htm>
2012 Journal Article A. Gill, M. et al. Modelling the potential for prescribed burning to mitigate carbon emissions from wildfires in fire-prone forests of Australia. (2012). at <http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/WF11023.htm>
2011 Conference Proceedings Morris, R. et al. The dirt on assessing post-fire erosion in the Mount Lofty Ranges: comparing methods. Bushfire CRC & AFAC 2011 Conference Science Day (2011). at <http://www.bushfirecrc.com/resources/pages-152-169-dirt-assessing-post-fire-erosion>
2011 Journal Article Penman, T. D. et al. Prescribed burning: how can it work to conserve the things we value?. International Journal of Wildland Fire 20, 721 (2011).
2009 Journal Article Bradstock, R. A., Cohn, J. S., A. Gill, M., Bedward, M. & Lucas, C. Prediction of the probability of large fires in the Sydney region of south-eastern Australia using fire weather. International Journal of Wildland Fire 18, 932 (2009).
2009 Journal Article Cary, G. J. et al. Relative importance of fuel management, ignition management and weather for area burned: evidence from five landscape–fire–succession models. International Journal of Wildland Fire 18, 147 (2009).
2008 Journal Article Boer, M. M., Sadler, R. J., Bradstock, R. A., A. Gill, M. & Grierson, P. Spatial scale invariance of southern Australian forest fires mirrors the scaling behaviour of fire-driving weather events. Landscape Ecology (2008). doi:10.1007/s10980-008-9260-5
2008 Journal Article King, K. J., Bradstock, R. A., Cary, G. J., Chapman, J. & Marsden-Smedley, J. B. The relative importance of fine-scale fuel mosaics on reducing fire risk in south-west Tasmania, Australia. International Journal of Wildland Fire 17, 421 (2008).
2008 Journal Article Vivian, L. M., Cary, G. J., Bradstock, R. A. & A. Gill, M. Influence of fire severity on the regeneration, recruitment and distribution of eucalypts in the Cotter River Catchment, Australian Capital Territory. Austral Ecology 33, 55 - 67 (2008).
2006 Journal Article King, K. J. et al. Simulation of prescribed burning strategies in south-west Tasmania, Australia: effects on unplanned fires, fire regimes, and ecological management values. International Journal of Wildland Fire 15, 527 (2006).

Posters credited

Using satellite data to identify fuel moisture conditions prior to major fires in South-East Australia 2009 Black Saturday and other large fire events - Moisture conditions project


Fuel moisture (FM) is a primary driver of the ignition and spread of wildfires. Monitoring FM is thus critically important for predicting forest fire risk.
Delivering Effective Prescribed Burning Across Southern Australia


Although many jurisdictions are committed to prescribed burning, we do not understand its effects on risks to people, property and environmental values across Australia.

Ross Bradstock Conference Poster 2016


This project will deliver a prescribed burning atlas to guide implementation of ‘tailor-made’ prescribed burning strategies to suit the biophysical, climatic and human context of all bioregions across southern Australia

Key Topics:
Heather Simpson Conference Poster 2016


This project strives to determine what effect suppression operations have on large fires.

Key Topics:
Owen Price Conference Poster 2016


To describe the actual and potential costs and benefits of bushfire preparedness and response operations through the assessment of specific Victorian case studies

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook