Our People

Prof Roger Jones
Project Leader

About

Roger Jones is a Professorial Research Fellow at the Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) at Victoria University, joining VU in early 2009. Previously he worked for CSIRO for thirteen years to early 2009. Trained as a physical scientist, he now applies an interdisciplinary focus to understanding climate change risk, bridging science, economics and policy, particularly in developing methodologies for assessing adaptation and mitigation strategies for managing climate change risks. These have been used widely in Australia and internationally, contributing to the Australian Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, the United Nations Development Program Adaptation Policy Frameworks and a range of individual projects. He was a convening Lead Author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Working Group II Fourth Assessment Report Chapter on New Methods and Characterisations of the Future released in 2007. He is currently working on a range of adaptation projects and developing new methods for assessing mitigation policy with Professor Peter Sheehan of the CSES..

Over the past decade, Prof Roger Jones has been the driving force in the application of risk methods to impact and adaptation assessment and continues to lead that area. He was Principal Research Scientist with CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research. Methods developed by Prof Jones have been used widely in Australia and internationally and have contributed to the Australian Climate Change Adaptation Strategy, the United Nations Development Program Adaptation Policy Frameworks and are being used by researchers in a number of countries. He was a convening Lead Author on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s Working Group II Fourth Assessment Report Chapter on New Methods and Characterisation of the Future.

More info:

Project leadership

Current government spending on natural disaster response is more than 20 times the spending on preparedness. Many climate-related natural hazards are increasing, along with the number of people living in hazard-prone areas. Large natural disasters also cross domains, moving from the private to the public realm, and shifting from a local, to a state or national concern. This raises the potential of future, unmanaged risks.

This project, now in its utilisation phase, mapped a broad range of economic, social and environmental values and related them to natural hazards across several case studies. It explored who owns these values and what happens when they cross domains, as well as how a range of alternative strategies may contribute to improved resilience by sustaining economic, social and environmental values in a changing environment.

Research team:
This project was commissioned and funded entirely by the Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning, Victoria.
Research team:

Supervisory roles

Year Type Citation
2017 Report Young, C. & Jones, R. Risk ownership for natural hazards: summary of key research findings. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2017 Report Young, C., Jones, R., Kumnick, M., Christopher, G. & Casey, N. Risk ownership framework for emergency management policy and practice. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2016 Report Young, C., Symons, J. & Jones, R. Institutional maps of risk ownership for strategic decision making. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Understanding values at risk and risk ownership workshop synthesis report. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Mapping and understanding bushfire and natural hazard vulnerability and risks at the institutional scale: Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2015 Report Young, C., Jones, R. & Symons, J. Mapping and understanding bushfire and natural hazard vulnerability and risks at the institutional scale: Annual project report 2014-2015. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Conference Paper Jones, R., Young, C. & Symons, J. Risk ownership and natural hazards: across systems and across values - peer viewed. Adelaide Conference 2015 (2015).
2015 Report Young, C., Symons, J. & Jones, R. Whose risk is it anyway?. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Report Young, C. & Jones, R. Mapping and Understanding Bushfire and Natural Hazard Vulnerability and Risks at the Institutional Scale Annual Report 2014. (2015).

Posters credited

Roger Jones Conference Poster 2016


The project has moved its focus from spatial mapping towards insitutional mapping to support strategic decision making surrounding prevention, preparedness, recovery and resilience using a multi-value approach.

Introducing the risk ownership framework for emergency management policy and practice


This project aims to develop a framework for understanding the ownership of risks from bushfires and natural hazards at the institutional level in order to improve risk governance.

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook