Our People

About

Kirrilly is a Senior Researcher at CQUni's Appleton Institute, as was one of ABC's Top 5 scientists under 40 for 2015.

She is a trained anthropologist who uses ethnographic methods to research the cultural dimensions of risk-perception and safety. Kirrilly has particular interests in human-animal interactions, high risk interspecies activities and equestrianism. She has proposed the 'Pets as Protective Factor' principle, based on a DECRA project identifying how animal attachment can be re-considered as a protective factor for human survival of natural disasters.

Project leadership

This project was commissioned and funded entirely by the Country Fire Service, SA. Following three very different bushfires in early 2014, the CFS commissioned the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC to conduct community-focused research with fire-affected communities.
Year Type Citation
2017 Journal Article Trigg, J., Smith, B. P., Bennett, P. & Thompson, K. Developing a scale to understand willingness to sacrifice personal safety for companion animals: The Pet-Owner Risk Propensity Scale (PORPS). International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction 21, 205-212 (2017).
2016 Journal Article Trigg, J., Thompson, K., Smith, B. P. & Bennett, P. An Animal Just Like Me: The Importance of Preserving the Identities of Companion-Animal Owners in Disaster Contexts. Social and Personality Psychology Compass 10, 26-40 (2016).
2016 Journal Article Every, D., Due, C., Thompson, K. & Ryan, J. “I know it sounds silly, but my pets mean the world to me”: Conflicting perspectives on animal rescues in natural disasters. Society & Animals 24, 358-382 (2016).
2015 Journal Article Thompson, K., Leighton, M. & Riley, C. Helping hands, hurting hooves: towards a multidisciplinary paradigm of large animal rescue. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 30, (2015).
2015 Report Trigg, J. et al. Capturing community experiences: South Australian bushfires January 2014. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Journal Article Thompson, K. For pet's sake, save yourself! Motivating emergency and disaster preparedness through relations of animal guardianship. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 30, (2015).
2015 Conference Paper Taylor, M. et al. Experiences of responders in supporting animals and their owners in disasters Conference Paper 2014. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC and AFAC Wellington Conference 2014 (2015).
2015 Journal Article Smith, B. P., Taylor, M. & Thompson, K. Risk perception, preparedness and response of livestock producers to bushfires: a South Australian case study. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 30, (2015).
2015 Journal Article Taylor, M. et al. The challenges of managing animals and their owners in disasters: perspectives of Australian response organisations and stakeholders. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 30, (2015).
2015 Journal Article Trigg, J., Smith, B. P. & Thompson, K. Does emotional closeness to pets motivate their inclusion in bushfire survival plans? Implications for emergency communicators. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 30, (2015).
2015 Journal Article Smith, B., Thompson, K. & Taylor, M. What’s the Big Deal? Responder Experiences of Large Animal Rescue in Australia. PLOS Currents Disasters (2015). doi:10.1371/currents.dis.71d34082943fa239dbfbf9597232c8a5

Posters credited

Managing animals in disasters (MAiD): Improving preparedness, response, and resilience through individual and organisational collaboration


The Managing Animals in Disasters project (MAiD) is seeking to identify and build best practice approaches to animal welfare emergency management to enable engagement with animal owners and other stakeholders in disasters/emergencies.  

Managing Animals in Disasters (MAiD): Improving Preparedness, Response, and Resilience through Individual and Organisational Collaboration


The Managing Animals in Disasters project (MAiD) is seeking to identify and build best practice approaches to animal emergency management to enable engagement with animal owners and other stakeholders in disasters and emergencies.

Lisel O'Dwyer Conference Poster 2016


Emergency responders (ERS) have identified horse owners and horses as a priority in animal emergency management.

Key Topics:

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook