Our People

Kat Haynes
Alt Project Leader

About

Dr Katharine Haynes is a Senior Research Fellow at Risk Frontiers, specialising in disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. She has considerable experience conducting quantitative and qualitative research with members of the public, emergency management practitioners, professionals and policy makers. Katharine has a special interest in participatory processes and action research as a means for community-based adaptation and risk reduction. Her research interests include: risk communication; the implementation and adaptation of policy and organisational procedure; the science-policy interface; and community and youth-based disaster risk reduction.

Katharine has experience working on a range of hazards and risks within: Montserrat, WI; Philippines; Indonesia; Australia and the United Kingdom. She has worked on a number of projects for the Australian emergency management sector, private organisations and international NGO’S. Recently Katharine has undertaken research for NCCARF, NSW State Emergency Services, NSW Fire and Rescue, Plan International, Sydney Water, Australian Building Code Board, the Bushfire CRC, the Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC, CSIRO and the Attorney General’s Department.

Katharine appeared as an expert witness for the Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission and is the moderator of the UNISDR Prevention Web online forum “Children, Youth and Disasters Network”.

Project leadership

This study has informed community flood warning campaigns, emergency services training and national policy initiatives by investigating the circumstances of all flood fatalities in Australia from 1900 to 2015. It has also compare the impacts of disasters from more than 100 years ago with more recent events.

By exploring the socio-demographic and environmental factors surrounding the 1,859 flood fatalities over 115 years, the research found distinct trends in relation to gender, age, activity and the circumstances of the death. These trends were analysed in the context of changes to emergency management policy and practice over time.

This project was commissioned and funded entirely by Fire & Rescue Service New South Wales. How effective were the Community Fire Units during the Blue Mountains bushfires in October 2013? This research examine this question in order to improve damage reduction outcomes and evaluate the effectiveness of equipment and training provided to CFU members.
Research team:
This new project will develop an understanding of the motivations, beliefs, decision making processes and information needs of at-risk groups for flood fatalities. It will cover both age and gender, including an understanding of what a Plan B would look like, how to motivate proactive decision making ahead of the journey, what the current challenges and barriers are to this and what further support and information is needed.
Year Type Citation
2017 Report Gissing, A., Tofa, M., Opper, S. & Haynes, K. Influence of road characteristics on flood fatalities in Australia. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2017 Conference Paper Haynes, K., Tofa, M., Gissing, A., Coates, L. & Roche, K. Sheltering in place during flooding: a case study of ex cyclone Debbie. AFAC17 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2017 Report Coates, L. et al. An analysis of human fatalities from cyclones, earthquakes and severe storms in Australia. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2016 Report Haynes, K., Coates, L. & van den Honert, R. An analysis of human fatalities and building losses from natural disasters: Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Haynes, K. et al. An analysis of human fatalities from floods in Australia 1900-2015. (2016).
2016 Conference Paper Rae, E., Campbell, P., Haynes, K., Gissing, A. & Coates, L. Preventing flood related fatalities: a focus on people driving through floodwater. AFAC16 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Journal Article Ronan, K. et al. Child-centered disaster risk reduction: Can disaster resilience programs reduce risk and increase the resilience of children and households?. The Australian Journal of Emergency Management 31, (2016).
2016 Report Towers, B. et al. Disaster resilience education: A practice framework for Australian emergency management agencies. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Ronan, K. et al. Building best practice in child-centred disaster risk reduction: Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Journal Article Gissing, A., Haynes, K., Coates, L. & Keys, C. Motorist behaviour during the 2015 Shoalhaven floods. Australian Journal of Emergency Management 31, (2016).
2015 Conference Paper Gissing, A., Haynes, K., Coates, L. & Keys, C. How do we reduce vehicle related deaths: exploring Australian flood fatalities 1900-2015 - non peer reviewed extended abstract. Adelaide Conference 2015 (2015).
2015 Report Blanchi, R. et al. Sheltering practices during bushfire. (CSIRO, 2015).
2015 Conference Paper Ronan, K. et al. Promoting Child Resilience to Disasters: Policy, Practice, Research Conference Paper 2014. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC and AFAC Wellington Conference 2014 (2015).
2015 Report Haynes, K. & Coates, L. An analysis of building losses and human fatalities from natural disasters: Annual project report 2014-2015. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Conference Paper van den Honert, R., Coates, L., Haynes, K. & Crompton, R. Estimating the Impacts of Natural Hazards on Fatalities and Building Losses Conference Paper 2014. Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC and AFAC Wellington Conference 2014 (2015).
2015 Journal Article Gissing, A., Haynes, K., Coates, L. & Keys, C. Reducing deaths from driving into floodwaters. Crisis Response Journal 11, 66-67 (2015).
2015 Journal Article Whittaker, J., Eriksen, C. & Haynes, K. Gendered responses to the 2009 Black Saturday Bushfires in Victoria, Australia. Geographical Research (2015). at <http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1745-5871.12162/abstract>
2015 Report Ronan, K. et al. Building best practice in child-centred disaster risk reduction: Annual project report 2014-2015. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2014 Journal Article Coates, L., Haynes, K., O'Brien, J., McAneney, J. & de Oliveira, F. Dimer. Exploring 167 years of vulnerability: An examination of extreme heat events in Australia 1844–2010. Environmental Science and Policy 42, 33-44 (2014).
2014 Journal Article Okada, T., Haynes, K., Bird, D., van den Honert, R. & King, D. Recovery and Resettlement following the 2011 flash flooding in Lockyer Valley. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 8, (2014).
2014 Report Haynes, K. & Bird, D. Investigating the activation of community fire units in the Blue Mountains during the October 2013 bushfires. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2014).
2013 Journal Article Whittaker, J., Haynes, K., Handmer, J. & McLennan, J. Community safety during the 2009 Australian ‘Black Saturday’ bushfires: an analysis of household preparedness and response. International Journal of Wildland Fire (2013). doi:10.1071/WF12010
2013 Journal Article Blanchi, R. et al. Environmental circumstances surrounding bushfire fatalities in Australia 1901–2011. Environmental Science & Policy 1-12 (2013). doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envsci.2013.09.013
2010 Journal Article Haynes, K., Handmer, J., McAneney, J., Tibbits, A. & Coates, L. Australian bushfire fatalities 1900-2008: exploring trends in relation to the `Prepare, stay and defend or leave early' policy. 13, 185 - 194 (2010).
2008 Book Chapter Paton, D. & Wright, L. Community bushfire safety (Handmer, J. & Haynes, K.) (CSIRO Publishing, 2008).
2008 Book Chapter Leonard, J. E. Community bushfire safety (Handmer, J. & Haynes, K.) (2008). at <http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/18/pid/5819.htm >
2007 Book Chapter Ganewatta, G. & Handmer, J. Community Bushfire Safety (Handmer, J. & Haynes, K.) (CSIRO Publishing/ Bushfire CRC, 2007). at <http://www.publish.csiro.au/nid/18/pid/5819.htm>

Posters credited

The role of children in disasters: A program of research


Children represent the most vulnerable demographic group in disasters.  

A cross cultural investigation of child-centred disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in Indonesia and Australia


There remains an assumption that children and young people are passive victims with no role to play in communicating risks or participating in risk reduction strategies. 

The heat is on... and has been for a while, new research shows


A paper analysing the historical impacts of extreme heatwaves in Australia has been one of the first outputs of a project to measure and understand the impacts of natural hazards in terms of human health and building damage. 

Estimating the Impacts of Natural Hazards on Property and Building Losses


To measure and understand the impacts of natural hazards in terms of the toll on human life and injuries, and building losses and damage, in order to provide an evidence base for emergency management policy and practise

Risk Reduction and Resilience Education: Recommendations for Scaling Up. Views from Indonesia


Nearly one third of the world's population are children. However, much disaster management programming sees children as passive participants, leaving them out of the planning and decision making process.

Key Topics:
Would You Drive Through Flood Water?


Floods are the second highest cause of death from natural hazard events in Australia following extreme heat. Bushfire and Natural Hazard CRC research has so far uncovered 1874 flood fatalities between 1900-2015. This data shows a growing number of fatalities associated with vehicles entering floodwaters, particularly 4WDs.

Key Topics:
An Evidence-Based Practice Framework for Children's Disaster Education


Disaster education for children has been identified as a key stragety for increasing disaster resilience. In Australia, comprehensive, evidence-based guidance for the development and implementation of quality education programmes is lacking. This framework, underpinned by current research in the field, aims to provide emergency service agencies and other stakeholders with a good practice approach to developing education programmes that foster children's capacities for building resilience.

Children and Youth in Disasters: A Co-Produced Program of Research


Children represent the most vulnerable demographic group in disasters.  The world health organisation estimates that 30-50% of disaster fatalities are children.  They are also most vulnerable to psychosocial impacts.  However, preliminary research and the new Sendai Framework also identifies them as community “drivers” of change for reducing current and future disaster risks and increasing community resilience.

Katharine Haynes Conference Poster 2016


This project is measuring and gaining a greater understanding of the impacts of natural hazards in terms of the toll of human life, injuries and building damage in order to provide an evidence base for emergency management policy and practice.

Pages

Resources credited

Type Released Title Download Key Topics
Presentation-Slideshow 21 Mar 2014 An analysis of human fatalities and building losses from natural disasters Save (250.37 KB) economics, infrastructure, risk analysis
Presentation-Slideshow 07 Aug 2014 Measuring the impacts of bushfires on human fatalities and building losses Save (3.25 MB) engineering, fire
Presentation-Slideshow 08 Sep 2014 Measuring the impacts of natural hazards on human fatalities and building losses Save (1.66 MB)
Presentation-Slideshow 10 Apr 2015 Human Fatalities and Building Losses 2015 NSW RAF Presentation Save (2.3 MB) infrastructure, multi-hazard
HazardNoteEdition 27 Aug 2015 Learning from the past, planning for the future Save (166.29 KB) modelling, multi-hazard, risk analysis
Presentation-Slideshow 03 Sep 2015 An analysis of human fatalities from flood hazards in Australia 1900-2014 Save (1.39 MB) flood, risk analysis, risk management
HazardNoteEdition 21 Oct 2015 Turning warnings into action Save (236.32 KB) animals, communication, tsunami
Presentation-Slideshow 17 May 2016 An analysis of human fatalities from flood hazards in Australia, 1900-2015 Save (1.78 MB) emergency management, flood, risk analysis
Presentation-Slideshow 01 Sep 2016 An analysis of human fatalities from flood hazards in Australia,1900-2015 - Katharine Haynes Save (1.28 MB) education, flood, policy
Presentation-Audio-Video 12 Oct 2016 Overview of flood research findings - An analysis of building losses and human fatalities Save (0 bytes) decision making, flood, warnings
HazardNoteEdition 13 Oct 2016 Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods? Save (867.95 KB) decision making, flood, warnings
Presentation-Slideshow 18 Apr 2017 Planning and Capability Requirements for Catastrophic and Cascading Events Save (1005.5 KB) capability, emergency management, multi-hazard
Presentation-Slideshow 18 Apr 2017 Flood Risk Communication Save (354.87 KB) communication, flood, warnings
Presentation-Slideshow 18 Apr 2017 An Analysis of Building Losses and Human Fatalities from Natural Disasters Save (5.22 MB) economics, multi-hazard, risk analysis
Presentation-Slideshow 07 Jul 2017 Lightning presentation: planning and capability requirements for catastrophic and cascading events Save (1021.56 KB) capability, emergency management, multi-hazard
Presentation-Slideshow 07 Sep 2017 Sheltering during floods: experiences of residents and businesses in the Northern Rivers region Save (760.42 KB) communities, flood, severe weather

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook