Duncan McLuckie

End-user
About
Duncan McLuckie

Lead end user

This study has informed community flood warning campaigns, emergency services training and national policy initiatives by investigating the circumstances of all flood fatalities in Australia from 1900 to 2015. It has also compare the impacts of disasters from more than 100 years ago with more recent events.

By exploring the socio-demographic and environmental factors surrounding the 1,859 flood fatalities over 115 years, the research found distinct trends in relation to gender, age, activity and the circumstances of the death. These trends were analysed in the context of changes to emergency management policy and practice over time.

This project is building on existing research to broaden the knowledge of the vulnerability of Australian building stock to riverine flooding and is identifying suitable retrofitting strategies. Existing building schema have been assessed, both national and internationally. This led to the development of a new building classification schema to categorise residential buildings into a range of typical storey types. Mitigation strategies developed nationally and internationally have been reviewed.
Research team:
This project, now in its utilisation phase, has addressed the data and knowledge gaps and requirements for disaster resilience, resource assessment, emergency management, risk mitigation policy and planning. It identified the fundamental data requirements and modelling framework to derive exposure information to enable a better understanding of the vulnerability of people, buildings and infrastructure.
This project is developing the evidence base for risk mitigation by devising simple practical and economic upgrading options for existing houses. The outcomes will promote retrofit investment by home owners and provide a basis for incentives to encourage this action through insurance and government initiatives.

Road networks and critical road structures such as bridges, culverts and floodways have a vital role before, during and after extreme events to reduce the vulnerability of the community.

A major gap in the current research is the lack of assessment techniques and tools to reduce the vulnerability of road structures to enhance both community and structural resilience. This project is developing tools and techniques to enhance the resilience of road infrastructure to hazards such as floods, bushfires, earthquakes and climate change-related weather events.

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