Our People

About

Prof. Charitha Pattiaratchi holds Bachelors, Masters and PhD degrees from the University of Wales, UK.  He has been at the University of Western Australia for over 20 years and currently holds the positions of Winthrop Professor of Coastal Oceanography and Head of the School of Environmental Systems Engineering.  Prof. Pattiaratchi has supervised over 30 PhD students and 100 honours students and has published over 300 articles/reports on coastal oceanography, which include over 100 in peer-reviewed international journals.  He has received more than $ 25 million in research funding.  Prof. Pattiaratchi's research interests are in coastal physical oceanography and coastal sediment transport, with emphasis on field experiments and numerical modelling.  He has played an active role in examining climate change effects in coastal regions of Western Australia and particularly in terms ocean currents, wind and wave climate, sea level variability, coastal flooding and beach stability.

More info:

Blog posts on Views & Visions

Post Date Key Topics
Mixing hobbies and science 15 Apr 2016 coastal, flood, tsunami

Project leadership

This project, which is now in its utilisation phase, developed better predictions and forecasts for extreme water levels arising from storm surges, surface waves, continental shelf waves, meteorological tsunamis, mean sea level rise and the transition from tropical to extra-tropical cyclones.
Year Type Citation
2017 Report Pattiaratchi, C. Developing better predictions for extreme water levels: annual project report 2016-17. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2017).
2016 Conference Paper Hetzel, Y., Janekovic, I. & Pattiaratchi, C. Improved predictions of Australian extreme sea levels through a coupled wave-surge model. AFAC16 (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Pattiaratchi, C. Developing better predictions for extreme water levels:Annual project report 2015-2016. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2016 Report Pattiaratchi, C., Wijeratne, E. M. S., Hetzel, Y. & Janekovic, I. Predicting continental shelf waves in Australia. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2016).
2015 Report Pattiaratchi, C. Developing better predictions for extreme water levels: Annual project report 2014-2015. (Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, 2015).
2015 Conference Paper Janekovic, I., Hetzel, Y. & Pattiaratchi, C. Improved modeling of extreme storm surges and waves along the Australian coast - non peer reviewed extended abstract. Adelaide Conference 2015 (2015).
2015 Report Hetzel, Y. & Pattiaratchi, C. Review of Tropical-Extratropical Cyclone Transitions Annual Report 2014. (2015).
2015 Presentation Pattiaratchi, C., Janekovic, I. & Hetzel, Y. Developing better predictions for extreme water levels. (2015).
2015 Conference Paper Hetzel, Y., Janekovic, I., Pattiaratchi, C. & Wijeratne, E. M. S. Storm surge risk from transitioning tropical cyclones in Australia. Australasian Coasts & Ports Conference 2015 (ResearchGate, 2015).
2015 Journal Article Pattiaratchi, C. & Wijeratne, E. M. S. Are meteotsunamis an underrated hazard?. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 373, (2015).
2014 Journal Article Pattiaratchi, C. & Wijeratne, E. M. S. Observations of meteorological tsunamis along the south-west Australian coast. Natural Hazards 74, 281-303 (2014).
2014 Journal Article Haigh, I. D. et al. Estimating present day extreme water level exceedance probabilities around the coastline of Australia: tropical cyclone-induced storm surges. Climate Dynamics 42, 139-157 (2014).
2014 Journal Article Haigh, I. D. et al. Estimating present day extreme water level exceedance probabilities around the coastline of Australia: tides, extra-tropical storm surges and mean sea level. Climate Dynamics 42, 121-138 (2014).
2014 Journal Article Haigh, I. D. et al. Timescales for detecting a significant acceleration in sea level rise. Nature Communications 5, (2014).

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook