Views and Visions: Posts from our People

Douglas Brown
Associate Student
Feb
9

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Complete use of non-combustible building materials
Complete use of non-combustible building materials

Building for bushfire examples

I recently took a short break from completing my PhD on bushfire architecture to visit Canberra and again see the rebuilding which occurred following the 2003 bushfires. Apart from improving the design of new homes in bushfire prone areas, I believe that how we rebuild after bushfires is an area that requires additional research.

Another area I believe warrants research is how to improve the bushfire protection of homes constructed before 1999, when the current Australian Standard (AS3959) came into being - this process is often referred to as ‘retrospective conversion’. While in Canberra I also advised an established Canberra architect on the unique design requirements necessary for designing two houses on steep blocks in bushfire prone areas of the ACT.

Integrated use of rendered masonry and steel walls, small metal windows with internal mesh screens. Of concern is the later placement of a timber bench, timber topped table  and coil doormat – these should be made of synthetic or metal materials.
Integrated use of rendered masonry and steel walls, small metal windows with internal mesh screens. Of concern is the later placement of a timber bench, timber topped table and coil doormat – these should be made of synthetic or metal materials.

On the side facing the fire threat there are smaller metal framed windows, rendered masonry walls, a metal porch and the area next to the building is non-combustible.
On the side facing the fire threat there are smaller metal framed windows, rendered masonry walls, a metal porch and the area next to the building is non-combustible.

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