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rockhampton_flood_sign_2013_flickr_rexboggs_cc.jpg

Water over road. Flickr/Rex Boggs/CC
Water over road. Flickr/Rex Boggs/CC
Release date
10 Apr 2017
More information:
Dr Michael Rumsewicz
Research Director

Funding available for TC Debbie and flood research

If you are planning on the ground research after Severe Tropical Cyclone Debbie, or the flooding in central and south east Queensland and northern New South Wales, consider applying for the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC’s Quick Response Fund.

Set up for research in the immediate aftermath of an emergency situation, the Quick Response Fund is available for up to $2,500 (including GST), per team, per event. Principally designed to reimburse travel-related expenses such as airfares, car rental and accommodation, applicants do not need to be current CRC researchers to be eligible. PhD students are also eligible to apply where an understanding of the event directly relates to their PhD studies.

More information about the Quick Response Fund - including an introduction, guidelines and application form - is available here. Email submissions to the CRC’s Research Director Dr Michael Rumsewicz at michael.rumsewicz@bnhcrc.com.au

This initiative was inspired by the Natural Hazards Centre in Boulder, USA, who run a similar scheme.

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News archives

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Research program in detail

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