News from the CRC

Flooded bridge, WA, February 2017

Floods can cause severe damage to bridges, roads and other infrastructure. Credit: Dana Fairhead.
Floods can cause severe damage to bridges, roads and other infrastructure. Credit: Dana Fairhead.
Release date
04 May 2017
More information:
Maryam Nasim

CRC student awarded for research paper

Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC PhD student Maryam Nasim has been awarded the Austroads Young Engineer Best Paper Award at the Austroards Bridge Conference 2017.

This is a prestigious award from a national bridge conference supported by road authorities, government agencies, consultants and researchers, both nationally and internationally.

Maryam Nasim is undertaking research into the vulnerability of U-slab bridges during flood. Floods have extremely dangerous potential to cause a great amount of damage to a large number of people, and, as communities grow, so does the potential for greater loss in threatened areas. The U-slab is a bridge type widely used in Australia and this research will provide vulnerability models for road authorities to use in developing strategies for hardening infrastructure.

Maryam is completing her PhD at RMIT University.

More news from the CRC

Dr Marta Yebra, Max Day
An inaugural award recognising scientific achievements has been presented to Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC researcher Dr Marta Yebra.
Celete Young at the AFAC16 conference.
Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC research Celeste Young has received the best poster award at the European Climate Change Adaptation Conference.
Many buildings built before the mid-1980s are vulnerable to severe wind, with Cyclone Larry wreaking havoc on Innisfail in Queensland in 2006.
A CRC PhD student's research has been voted the favourite at the 13th America's Conference on Wind Engineering.
Kevin Ronan at the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction conference in Cancun, Mexico
A CRC academic is part of a global network dedicated to ensuring concerted approaches among agencies focused on disaster risk reduction.
Fire Australia Issue Two 2017
There is plenty of CRC science in the latest edition of Fire Australia.
Steve Sutton inspects the remains of a house on Simeulue smashed by the 2004 tsunami
From a young age, people on northern Indonesia's Simeuleu Island learn that when the earth shakes, run to the hills. What can we learn from Simeulue, and how can we make disaster preparation normal in Australia?
SES volunteers undertaking a search.
Finding out why volunteers leave - and developing ways to improve volunteer retention—has been the focus of CRC research.
Margaret River Fire
One of the most challenging situations in fire management is when relatively non-threatening weather conditions are expected, but a severe fire eventuates.
Research shows that the most common way people are killed during a flood is when they attempt to cross a bridge or flooded road. Photo: Dana Fairhead
CRC research into where, why and how Australians are dying in floods is helping to increase flood safety and awareness.
Research is modelling the potential impact of disasters beyond our experience
The new-look Disaster Resilience Knowledge Hub from the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience will feature a selection of key Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC research.

News archives

All the resources from our 2016 conference

Research program in detail

Where, why and how are Australians dying in floods?

2015-2016 year in review

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

Explore by keyword