News from the CRC

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Planning for animals during an emergency adds another layer of complexity.
Planning for animals during an emergency adds another layer of complexity.

Collaboration, community preparedness and updated priorities for natural hazards research

Issue Four of Fire Australia for 2017 includes research on including animals in emergency planning, the launch of the new national priorities in natural hazards research, details from our annual conferrence AFAC17 and a Black Saturday case study that has developed guidelines for improved community messaging in bushfires.

Research from the Managing animals in disasters project has helped to improve community resilience by developing better ways to include animals in household emergency plans. While most pet owners consider their pets as family members, there remains a relatively poor level of planning for pets and animals, which can in turn endanger the lives of owners, animals and emergency services personnel. The project, in partnership with the Blue Mountains Animal Ready Community, has identified common issues among animal owners in emergency and will be used to develop a community guide to establishing animal ready communities. Find out more.

Back in July, the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC launched an updated set of priorities for natural hazards research in Australia. These priorities were developed through consultation with the emergency management sector through workshops across the country, from which were drawn four key recurring themes: shared responsibility and community engagement, risk communication, climate change and better predictions of hazards. Read all about the National research priorities for natural hazards emergency management

Our annual conference, AFAC17 powered by INTERSCHUTZ, was held in Sydney from 4–7 September in partnership with AFAC. More than 3,200 people from across the sector attended, with over 100 speakers across the three days. Recap the conference highlights here.

The 2009 Black Saturday bushfires were one of Australia’s deadliest and costliest disasters. A new industry guideline has been released by AFAC that uses the fires as a case study to improve community safety messaging. The case study outlines how this guideline was created from research findings of the Bushfire CRC’s 2014 Lessons learnt from the Black Saturday bushfires report, identifying factors that were crucial to the success of the project, with a particular emphasis on collaboration and relationships between researchers, end-users and emergency management authorities.

Fire Australia is a joint publication of the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, AFAC and the Fire Protection Association Australia. Find this and previous editions of Fire Australia at www.bnhcrc.com.au/news/fire-australia.  

More news from the CRC

Fires in Portugal. Photo: Joao Clerigo (CC BY-NC 2.0)
A European based research project is linking several major organisations, including the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC, on bushfire research and response.
Tasmania bushfires, February 2016. Photo by Mick Reynolds, NSW Rural Fire Service
Watch the latest videos explaining our research and what we've discovered so far.
Students take part in a workshop on presentation skills.
Four CRC PhD students had the chance to present their research as part of a three-minute-thesis at the latest Research Advisory Forum (RAF) in Sydney on 12 and 13 April.
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Doug Hart (left) was acknowledge for his Black Saturday report by the chair of the AFAC Community Safety Group Andrew Stark.
The author of a CRC report on the 2009 Black Saturday fires has been acknowledged for his contribution to community safety.
Dr Marta Yebra conducting a grassland fire experiment. Photo: Carolina Luiz
The first web-based system in Australia to assist land managers and fire agencies monitor live fuel moisture in vegetation was showcased recently in a webinar.
Photographs taken by field or aerial observers are essential. Photo: Stephen Wilkes.
Predicting blow up bushfires and fire thunderstorms.
Japan deployment. Photo: Tim Fox AFSM
A new national learning and training resource has been created by researchers to strengthen leadership and learning.
The Elephant Hill Fire. Photo: Paul Simakoff Eliims
The first edition of Fire Australia for 2018 is now available, featuring research on predicting fire thunderstorms, catastrophic flood planning and the future impacts of rising sea levels on coastal communities.
The International Day for Disaster Reduction panel.
On 2017's International Day for Disaster Reduction, the CRC gathered nearly 50 emergency management practitioners and researchers in Sydney to reflect on how at-risk communities are reducing their exposure to disasters.

News archives

AFAC17 logo

AFAC17 logo

All the resources from our 2017 conference

National research priorities for natural hazards

National research priorities for natural hazards

National priorities for research

The Sir Ivan fire. Photo: Nick Moir, Fairfax Media

The Sir Ivan fire. Photo: Nick Moir, Fairfax Media

Research findings from 2017 NSW fires

Four years of highlights

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

Explore by keyword

Index of Editions

Issue One of Fire Australia for 2018 includes a recap of the International Day for Disaster Reduction, investigates what catastrophic flooding could look like in Sydney, asks if your coastal community can cope with rising sea levels, highlights our research in incident management development and looks at predicting blow up bushfires.
Issue Four 2017 of Fire Australia includes research on including animals in emergency planning, details from AFAC17, new priorities in natural hazards research, and a Black Saturday case study to develop guidelines for improved community messaging in bushfires.
Issue Three of Fire Australia for 2017 features new prediction software for predictions of bushfire spread, how NSW's geography curriculum allows students to become agents of change for community resilience, suggestions for reducing the risks involved in prescribed burning, research on the impacts of severe wind during Cyclone Debbie, and new natural hazards science at the Bushfire and Natural Hazards CRC.
Issue Two of Fire Australia for 2017 features information about a weather phenomena called a mountain wave that produces severe fire behaviour, an analysis of flood fatalities in Australia, what we can learn about disaster preparation from Indonesia, and leadership for our emergency service volunteers.
Issue One of Fire Australia for 2017 features firestorms, disaster resilience, fire preparation in Bangladesh and the International Day for Disaster Reduction.
PhD progress, human factors and decision-making capabilities, asbestos risk and the role of pharmacies in disasters are showcased in the Spring 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine.
The Winter 2016 edition of Fire Australia magazine highlights important research including reducing hazard impacts with smarter spending, fire modelling and wind behaviour as well as the rewarding experience of PhD student placements in the sector.
Mitigating disasters: how damage from floods, fires and storms can be prevented through careful planning and investment; a new approach to flood forecasting using remote sensing data; and case studies from the CRC are highlighting paths to integrate bushfire science into government policy and planning.
Developing a smartphone app to measure fuels for bushfire, 2015's International Day for Disaster Reduction, a case study on the Be Ready Warrandyte initiative and a look at what could happen if Adelaide was hit by a large earthquake.
Community resilience in the remote north, how NSW RFS used research to change their approach to engagement around bushfire survival planning, and case studies on CRC research impact.