News from the CRC

ses_search.jpg

SES volunteers undertaking a search.
SES volunteers undertaking a search.
Release date
15 Feb 2016
More information:
Sarah Hall
PhD Student

On-call responders needed for study

If you volunteer or work on-call you can assist valuable research to ensure the health and safety of emergency personnel.

CRC Associate Student Sarah Hall is assessing the sleep quality, quantity and stress physiology of emergency service volunteers and career staff who operate on-call, as part of her PhD study at Deakin University.

Currently Sarah needs to gather data, and is seeking the help of males in emergency services who work on-call. Participants in the research should be aged between 18-75 and can be in either first responder or support roles.

What does participation involve?

Participants will be required to wear an activity monitor and complete a sleep and work diary for two weeks, as well collect saliva samples for one week. Participants are sent a study kit in the mail and there is no need attend any testing sessions.

This first stage of Sarah’s research will only investigate men, as men and women cannot be tested together due to different physiological responses. It is anticipated that the same research will be completed with females in the second stage of the research.

Participation is open to emergency personnel in all states and territories, and has ethics approval from Deakin University.

If you are interested in finding out more information about participating, please contact Sarah on 03 9244 5033, 0425 861 019 or sarahjah@deakin.edu.au

More news from the CRC

AFAC16 Powered by INTERSCHUTZ
Large and destructive hurricanes and storms that have lashed the United States in recent years will be used as case studies on disaster recovery to launch the Research Forum of AFAC16 - register by 24 June to get the...
Post fire field work
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Alex Wolkow assessed how sleep deprivation and stress impacted on firefighter performance.
A number of previous Bushfire CRC students have recently had their theses accepted to complete their PhD’'s, offering important research to support emergency services.
Direct engagement in professional development, workshops and project teams is the most effective way to use research, according to the 2016 Review of Research Utilisation survey.
Briony's research led to an ebook to help parents talk to their kids about bushfires.
CRC research has contributed towards new and improved school education pages in WA, providing a suite of fun and engaging resources to teach children about hazards.
House flooded in Victoria
CRC researchers, Andrew Gissing, Katharine Haynes and Lucinda Coates have received a highly commended award for their presentation at the 2016 Floodplain Management Australia (FMA) conference.
An aircraft responds to a fire in Victoria. Photo by Wayne Rigg, CFA
A Victorian multi-agency team shares first hand insights on how they successfully moved an evidence-approach into practice in a research utilisation case study.
Reducing the risk through fuel reduction burning
This is the May 2016 newsletter from the Scientific diversity, scientific uncertainty and risk mitigation policy and planning project (RMPP), with updates for project end-users.
CRC sign
New journal articles and reports on CRC research are available online.
Australian Journal of Emergency Management April 2016
The latest edition of the Australian Journal of Emergency Management is out now, published by the Australian Institute for Disaster Resilience.

News archives

All the resources from our 2015 conference

Research program in detail

Research proceedings from 2015 annual conference

Explore by keyword