Monitoring and predicting natural hazards

HazardNOTES

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Dr Marta Yebra conducting a grassland fire experiment. Photo: Carolina Luiz
Dr Marta Yebra conducting a grassland fire experiment. Photo: Carolina Luiz

The ability to understand, predict, forecast and monitor natural hazards is fundamental to improving resilience through better planning, preparedness, risk management and response. The focus of the Monitoring and prediction cluster is to improve present predictive capabilities through of expanding the underpinning data as well as the range of monitoring and modelling techniques. 

This cluster has five linked studies:

  • Improved predictions of severe weather to reduce community impact
  • Disaster landscape attribution 
  • Mapping bushfire hazard and impacts
  • Mitigating the effects of severe fires, floods and heatwaves through improvements to land dryness measures and forecasts 
  • Improving flood forecast skill using remote sensing

In addition to the Hazard Note, in the short video below cluster leader Dr Jeff Kepert (Bureau of Meteorology) gives an overview of the research, its challenges and how end-users will benefit from the science.

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AFAC17 logo

AFAC17 logo

All the resources from our 2017 conference

National research priorities for natural hazards

National research priorities for natural hazards

National priorities for research

The Sir Ivan fire. Photo: Nick Moir, Fairfax Media

The Sir Ivan fire. Photo: Nick Moir, Fairfax Media

Research findings from 2017 NSW fires

Four years of highlights

Bushfire planning with kids ebook

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